63°F
Sponsored by

Utah students take on air quality problem

Air quality meets education at four Wasatch Front Schools. The Utah Division of Air Quality and Breathe Utah put air monitoring devices at the schools to get multiple levels of air quality in different places.

HOLLADAY, Utah (ABC 4 Utah)- Air quality meets education at four Wasatch Front Schools. The Utah Division of Air Quality and Breathe Utah put air monitoring devices at the schools to get multiple levels of air quality in different places. Before this week, there was just one monitoring device in Salt Lake. We take a closer look at what it means to spread out the readings and involve students.

“Ok guys so the division of air quality has given us something called a particulate reader,” said Morningside Middle School science teacher Mrs. Leslie Chatelain. We find out how many particulates were in our air. How clean or dirty our air is.”

And sixth grade students at Morningside Elementary School will get to use the air quality monitoring device to keep track of the levels here in Holladay. They’ll send those results to state lab and then use the data right here in the classroom.

“Coming out of a textbook, coming out of a lecture, kids make it their own when they can get their hands on what they're doing,” said Morningside Middle School Principal Tod Cracroft.

In the school’s computer lab, these students crunch data. It’s real-life data that affects their everyday life.

“When we have bad air quality days, some of our respiratory problem kids, they'll have to stay in and if it’s bad enough all of us will stay in,” said Cracroft.

Morningside is just one of a handful of new locations across the Wasatch Front. Breathe Utah Executive Director Erin Mendenhall says that’s much better than just one reader in Salt Lake.

“We'll be getting unique data back we've never seen before,” said Breathe Utah Executive Director Erin Mendenhall.

She says they’ll know just how bad it is and how much it varies in different areas and it could help fuel the legislative push for change.

“There are going to be a lot of bills on the hills that approach air quality and mitigation and we need to be supportive of those bills,” said Mendenhall.

But the true solutions to air quality control might come from one of these young, inquisitive minds. Kids could have the answer to the looming problem.

“Make it as real life as possible. That's what we try to do with science. To have an inquiry based learning, that's what the kids like hands on experience, that makes all the difference,” said Cracroft.

Morningside elementary school will have the monitoring device for two months. The D.A.Q. is willing to allow some schools to keep the technology for the rest of the school year so teachers can use the data for their math and science classes.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
local-businesses.png
cars.png dixie-local.jpg
Comic Con


TV Schedule Sponsored By:

Top Stories

Popular Stories on Facebook