54°F
Sponsored by

Utah man fasting to stop same sex marriages

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) – A Utah man is vowing to go without any food until the state stops allowing same sex marriages. He claims if Utah wants to protect traditional marriage, it has an option it’s not using, and he's fasting until it does it.
SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) – A Utah man is vowing to go without any food until the state stops allowing same sex marriages. He claims if Utah wants to protect traditional marriage, it has an option it’s not using, and he's fasting until it does it.

When same sex marriage became legal in Utah, people immediately reacted. Couples stormed county clerk buildings. State attorneys tried to stop it, and Trestin Meacham started fasting.

"I'm very disappointed," said Trestin Meacham, fasting to stop Utah same sex marriages.

For the past 12 days Meacham hasn't eaten anything. He's surviving solely on water and an occasional vitamin.

"You can start a blog and you can complain on social networks until you're blue in the face and nothing will happen but actions speak louder than words and I'm taking action," said Meacham.

Meacham tells Reporter Brian Carlson he's fasting to convince Utah to exercise the option of “nullification.” It's posted on Meacham's blog. According to his interpretation of states’ rights, Utah can nullify the recent federal court ruling by simply choosing not to follow it.

"Jefferson made clear that the courts are not the supreme arbitrators of what is and what is not constitutional. The states also have power," said Meacham.

But that's not the interpretation of attorney Greg Skordas.

"If people want to change that they have to go through the appropriate processes," said Greg Skordas, Attorney.

Skordas said nullification doesn't work with Utah’s case. When the federal government grants someone a constitutional right, states must recognize it.

"When individual personal liberties are at stake the state can't infringe on that, even if it's the will of the people," said Skordas.

But that opinion is not deterring Meacham. So far he's lost 25 pounds.

"I had to punch a hole in my belt to make it fit,” said Meacham.

“That's how much weight you've lost?” Reporter Brian Carlson asked.

“To hold my pants up, yes," Meacham said.

He vows to keep going and hopes the state will take action.

"They don't have to go through the legal court battles and waste our money, they can end it tomorrow with the act of nullification," he said.

------
Follow Brian Carlson on Twitter: @briancarlsontv
Or on Facebook: facebook.com/abc4briancarlson

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
local-businesses.png
cars.png dixie-local.jpg
Comic Con


TV Schedule Sponsored By:

Popular Stories on Facebook