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Here's what happens if the government shuts down

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) - It's been nearly two decades since the federal government faced a shutdown because congress couldn't agree on a budget. Based on what we know from the last shutdown in 1995, here's how you and your family would likely be affected.
SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) - It's been nearly two decades since the federal government faced a shutdown because congress couldn't agree on a budget. Based on what we know from the last shutdown in 1995, here's how you and your family would likely be affected.

It's estimated 800,000 to a million federal workers will be sent home without pay. Many, if not most, federal offices and programs would be closed.

Food stamps will still be issued, but a long delay could mean a loss of funding for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, also known as WIC.

"It's a supplemental food program that helps families with their nutrition needs and with breast feeding promotion,” explained WIC Salt Lake County Bureau Manager Iliana MacDonald.

In Salt Lake County alone there are 24,000 WIC clients that would be referred to food pantries if funding runs out.

WIC participant Kelsey Garrett told ABC 4 Utah, "It's scary to think about. It would obviously impact my family as well as many other Utah families."

On top of federal programs, national parks would close. If you're already camping there you'll have two days to vacate.

Passport applications will likely go unprocessed. During the last shutdown 200,000 applications were halted.

For America’s 1.4 million troops, and their families, the shutdown could mean paychecks would be delayed. While all active duty military are essential and have to report to work, the Department of Defense says if a shutdown lasts longer than a week the pentagon might not be able to process its payroll in time for the October 15th paychecks.

Jasmine Katchen a military family member from Fort Campbell, Kentucky said, "There are going to be bills that are going to be due. You can't just tell the electric department, 'hey, I got an IOU!'"

Like the military, critical functions or services of the government would stay open. Air traffic control, border security, food inspections, the maintenance of the power grid and banking system will still be up and running. The postal service would continue to deliver mail and the government would pay out benefits. Medicare, Medicaid and social security are considered mandatory.
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