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Hanging Christmas Lights

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, every year more than 12,000 people are treated in emergency rooms for injuries such as falls, cuts and shocks related to holiday lights and other decorations.
Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat about 12,500 people for injuries such as falls, cuts and shocks, related to holiday lights, decorations and Christmas trees, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety commission (CPSC).

Emily Wilde, a TaskEasy Installer, Manager and Trainer gives us some reminders to stay safe.
•Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat about 12,500 people for injuries, such as falls, cuts and shocks, related to holiday lights, decorations and Christmas trees, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

Three important tips for installing your Holiday Lights

1. Stay off your roof
  • •Roofs are slippery when snowpacked
  • •Even if the roof looks clear, cold temperatures can create patches of frost that are extremely slippery

2. Ladder Safety
  • Always use the proper step stool or ladder to reach high places. Don’t stand on chairs, desks, garbage cans or other furniture
  • A straight or extension ladder should be placed one foot away from the surface it rests against for every four feet of ladder height.
  • Always keep three points of contact on the ladder whether two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand.
  • When climbing, keep your hips between the side rails and do not lean too far or overreach. (we all do this)
  • Use ladders with slip-resistant feet and wear clean, dry and slip-resistant shoes when climbing a ladder (especially with Winter upon us here in Utah, those metal ladders could be slippery, shoes boots collect moisture from ground)
  • Stay on your ladder, cold and wet conditions are dangerous if you're on the roof. Frost patches are invisible and can pose a great risk to falling.
3. Electrical Safety
  • Inspect your lights for damage or exposed wires. If your lights are in poor shape, it's time to replace them.
  • When using strings of lights that plug into each other, never piggyback more than three strands. They could trip your breaker or could become a fire hazard to your home.
  • Do not use “indoor” lights for outdoor lighting displays. “Indoor” holiday lights are not designed to withstand extreme hot and cold temperatures. Use lights that are rated for outdoor displays
  • Power strips and extension cords are also labeled for indoor and outdoor use and should be used accordingly
  • If you have a few extra lights at the end of the string, don't cut the wires and leave the connection bare. If the lights fall off your house they become an electrocution risk
  • CPSC started monitoring holiday lights and decorations sold at stores nationwide
Make sure installers you hire have Worker's Comp and General Liability Insurance (not just health insurance), if the installer gets hurt at your house and is uninsured you could be liable. Be careful who you hire.

For more information, please visit: TaskEasy.
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