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First responders say Martin MacNeill was "frantic" the day his wife died

PROVO, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) – Monday the jury in the murder trial against former Utah doctor Martin MacNeill heard from the police officers and paramedics who first arrived on the scene on April 11, 2007.
PROVO, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) – Monday the jury in the murder trial against former Utah doctor Martin MacNeill heard from the police officers and paramedics who first arrived on the scene on April 11, 2007.

The first responders testified today that Martin MacNeill was hysterical the day his wife died; that he was so disruptive that he had to be removed from the bathroom. We also got a glimpse of the defense's strategy. It appears they're setting up a case to have the jury dismiss these testimonies.

Frantic and agitated - that’s how emergency responders described Martin MacNeill the day his wife was found unconscious in the bathtub of their home.

Pleasant Grove Fire Chief Marc Sanderson testified, "He was moving about quickly, up and down the hall, in the living room out on to the front porch. It was very hard to keep him in one place."

He was so disruptive he had to be removed from the bedroom where emergency personnel were working on Michele MacNeill.

Pleasant Grove Police officer Dan Beckstrom told the court, "He was hysterical, he was blurting out things like ‘why did you have to have the surgery? Why god?’"

Prosecutors accuse MacNeill of drugging and drowning his wife in order to be with his mistress. MacNeill told emergency crews it was an accident.

"He made a comment that she had overdosed on pain medication and also commented on slipping in the tub and hitting her head,” said Sanderson.

According to the 911 tapes played on day 1 of the trail, MacNeill said he couldn't get his wife out of the tub, but he drained it and started CPR, something prosecutors question.

Deputy Utah County Attorney Sam Pead asked Officer Joshua Motsinger, "Can CPR be done when someone is slumped over in a tub?” Montsinger responded, “No."

When emergency crews arrived they found Michele MacNeill on the tile floor cold, pale and wet.

Montsinger testified, "She was wet, her hair was wet and her upper body appeared to be wet."

After several minutes of CPR emergency crews say Michele expelled lots of water, but never really showed signs of life.

Pead asked, "How were the resuscitation efforts working on Michele?”
Sanderson replied, “They weren't working at all."

Every one of the emergency responders who testified today was asked by the defense about their memory, and the day they were interviewed by investigators a year later in 2008. They all admitted they were questioned together, at the same time, in the same room and were able to hear each other's answers to the investigators questions. It appears the defense is making the argument that none of their witness testimony can be trusted because it's tainted.
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