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Heart disease is the #1 killer of women

MURRAY, Utah (ABC4 Utah) - With Valentine's day just a few days ago, you may have been thinking a lot about the heart recently, but the Intermountain Medical Center is hoping more women think about their heart health. You may not realize, for women, heart disease is more common and more deadly than cancer.
MURRAY, Utah (ABC4 Utah) - With Valentine's day just a few days ago, you may have been thinking a lot about the heart recently, but the Intermountain Medical Center is hoping more women think about their heart health. You may not realize, for women, heart disease is more common and more deadly than cancer.

If you're a woman concerned about your health, your first worry might be breast cancer, but right now a different disease is demanding more women's attention.

"Heart disease is the #1 killer of women in the United States," said Deborah Budge, Cardiologist, Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute.

Cardiologist Deborah Budge with the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute said heart disease accounts for the deaths of 1 out of every 3 women.

"When we talk of 1 out of 3 women die of heart disease, we're really talking about not only heart attacks, but also strokes, and complications of high blood pressure," said Budge.

High blood pressure is how heart patient Marna Patch from Midway discovered she had heart problems.

"Those little things in the grocery store, I put my arm in it and I think it was 240 something, the pharmacist was there and I said ‘Is this machine broken?" said Marna Patch, heart patient.

Patch later suffered two heart attacks and has since had several heart surgeries. If you want to improve your heart health, Dr. Budge recommends you know the risk factors for heart attacks and strokes.

"If you have this moment where you're short of breath, sweaty, nausea and that's not common for you, that could actually be a heart attack," said Budge.

She said even healthy women need to get their blood pressure checked every two years.

"Once you're above that 140/90 number, something needs to change," she said.

Marna Patch said she's glad she did. If she hadn't, she might not be alive today.

"My heart doctor has been wonderful, I think he saved my life, in fact I know he saved my life," said Patch.

If you're a woman concerned about your heart health, click on this link to the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute for more information.

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